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20130128
20130128
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's going on in washington. we know this week that the house voted to extend the debt ceiling for a few months. we still face the sequestration and the continuing resolution. how does this play out? >> forever. >> feels like that. >> forever. they don't agree. so we're seeing an overlay of this, you know, one side the republicans, the other side the democrats. and i must say post-election, president obama has become more aggre aggressive. military spending, they don't agree with what taxation should be, title, on and on and on. gun control, they don't agree. and on the other hand, you know, we have this sort of slow economy that makes it more difficult to cut a deal. and i should add to that, a constitutional crisis in a way because this whole debt ceiling has been a weapon that the house of representatives have used to gain power. it's not just the republicans versus the democrats. it's the house versus the president. i don't know how it the play out. >> meanwhile, the marketses are on fire. the s&p 500 hitting a new five-year high along with the dow jones industrial average. what is d
backed off that so you didn't get that outcome. at the same time, they've pushed off the debt ceiling for a few months. so the body language out of washington has been more constellatory. so when you get to this point where you think about what the deficit might look like this year, i don't think you're going to be looking at a balanced budget so soon. you can't sustain trillion dollar deficiter year after year after year doubling the debt so many years and still think that the market is going to accept that over time. they know the market needs to move away from this, but it's going to away longer process. >> kevin and mike will be with us for the rest of the hour. >> and it's time for the global markets report. kelly evans is standing by in london. i could string up a lot of thing to talk to you about, kelly. you're very close to davos. i don't know. we -- i don't really feel like i've missed anything, really. but you're still close. you could have jetted over there easily and joined in with, you know, john legend and charlie thero this e, andrew ross sorkin. >> i was hoping maybe s
, the largest in u.s. history, or if you can use the debt ceiling, which you cannot in the end pull the trigger on, because even though you could probably go without technical default for months and months, it would be catastrophic. it would mean you'd have to cut spending by 40% overnight which you can't do. so unless you can execute the bluff, don't do it because obama will call it, as he called it on january 1 of this year, as he would with the debt ceiling. don't -- if you can't carry out the bluff. i hope you weren't plauding carrying out the bluff, in which case my entire argument is undermined and has gone nowhere. >> i think that's a small contingent against suicidal charges. >> and they are on suicide watch. i hope their shoelaces have been removed. [laughter] >> so you do what i think the house members and their retreat in williamsburg very cleverly did. you pick your fights and don't try to govern from one house to get very small advances. i thought i recommended last week that in return for a temporary debt ceiling hike of three months, they demand that the senate produce a budget.
party put forward a plan on the debt ceiling in debt and appears to have won the support of both the president and senate majority leader. the republican change in direction and tone was not matched by a change in the republican party's lead. the rnc reelected the chairman after losing both the white house and ten seats in congress to democrats in that 2012 election. his job as head of the national party even as lenient -- louisiana's popular governor and from a republican both cried out for the party's revitalization, new ideas, and the voices. obama administration stalwart treasury secretary gagger and secretary of state clinton bidding farewell to the administration. clinton finally this week testifying on benghazi, trying to explain away one of the administration's biggest failures. another week in which president obama has dispatched vice-president biden to campaign against the second amendment. the president's inaugural this week. next week he launches his campaign for comprehensive immigration reform. next week senator kerry to be confirmed as the next secretary of state a
obama is sort of strategically on this. two summers ago during the debt ceiling talks, there was signals of the white house to raise the eligible age of medicare like two months ago signals ago cpi change is good and then paul ryan saying i don't think there's anything and going to accept the sequester, you know which touches defense and not the social safety net at all and that's it. have we entered a new face and medicare and medicaid off the table? what do you think? >> i wouldn't be so sure. you're right the president is all over the map on this and yesterday there's an interview with him in "the new republic" and might have been code words and wanted the talk about judicious reforms to medicare and mart changes to social security and how he's willing to buck what he called i think the ideological wing of the party. this kind of a thing and so as you mentioned he's many times before have been willing to even interested in floating changes to medicare and medicaid and now to think he's not going to is a stretch at this point. >> have republic
. so the resolution of the debt ceiling crisis in particular, i think was a big moment for the market. we are targeting 2.25% on the ten-year over the next couple of months. as you mentioned, economic momentum is getting a little better. really, the underlying trend of things is not so bad for the economy. and if you do get, as your previous guest noted, another move up of 3%, 4%, 5% in equities, then that could easily be the impetus to get treasury yields even higher than they are today. >> the big question, and we should talk about it, is the losses that people could suffer moving forward. but for the moment, if we take a historical perspective, we're still at very low interest rates, aren't we. 4%, 5% would be a normal rate. i assume this is not necessarily at the moment at this level a problem in slowing the economy. >> no, we're not panicked. in fact, we think that treasury yields will probably find a plateau somewhere around that 2.25% and end the year somewhere about where they are today. treasury yields, at least at the moment, are heavily influenced by supply and demand facto
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)